Respect for the Individual


In our residential treatment programs, each resident is seen as a unique individual with their own strengths and weaknesses.

Residents are accepted and appreciated for who they are, rather than being viewed as a “case” or a “patient.”

France Retreat

Retreat-based therapy is designed to offer respite from the chaos, stress, and often overwhelming demands of everyday life.

At France Retreat we offer a safe space for an individual, couple, or family to slow down, reflect, heal, and restore. At our retreat, people can find the space and time they need to process personal, psychological, emotional, relationship, or spiritual issues in order to return to daily life feeling strengthened, renewed, and better able to meet a variety of challenges.

Mental toughness

Mental toughness is about more than just having resilience and control in difficult situations. It relates to a psychological frame of mind that endorses confidence and commitment to success. In his book Developing Mental Toughness, the psychologist Peter Clough describes mental toughness as a combination of the following:

  • The amount of control a person believes they have over their life and emotions;
  • How much commitment is placed upon achieving goals despite hardship;
  • Being able to see potential threats as opportunities for self-development;
  • Continuing to strive in changing environments;
  • The level of confidence a person has in succeeding despite setbacks.

Mental toughness levels are influenced by many different factors. While genetics are partly responsible, a person’s environment is also relevant. For example, both positive experiences while you’re young and mental toughness training programmes have been found to make people mentally tougher.

https://theconversation.com/mental-toughness-can-help-you-cope-with-challenging-events-like-the-pandemic-heres-how-to-cultivate-

Self-efficacy

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Self-efficacy is, according to psychologist Albert Bandura who originally proposed the concept, a personal judgment of how well or poorly a person is able to cope with a given situation based on the skills they have and the circumstances they face.[1]

Self-efficacy affects every area of human endeavor. By determining the beliefs a person holds regarding their power to affect situations, Self-Efficacy strongly influences both the power a person actually has to face challenges competently and the choices a person is most likely to make. These effects are particularly apparent, and compelling, with regard to investment behaviors such as in health,[2] education,[3] and agriculture.[4]

A strong sense of self efficacy promotes human accomplishment and personal well-being. A person with high self-efficacy views challenges as things that are supposed to be mastered rather than threats to avoid. These people are able to recover from failure faster and are more likely to attribute failure to a lack of effort. They approach threatening situations with the belief that they can control them. These things have been linked to lower levels of stress and a lower vulnerability to depression. [1]

In contrast, people with a low sense of self-efficacy view difficult tasks as personal threats and shy away from them. Difficult tasks lead them to look at the skills they lack rather than the ones they have. It is easy for them to lose faith in their own abilities after a failure. Low self-efficacy can be linked to higher levels of stress and depression. [1]