Common Reaction of the brain to an abuser

Several important ingredients that contribute to someone’s “addiction” to their abuser are oxytocin (bonding), endogenous opioids (pleasure, pain, withdrawal, dependence), corticotropin-releasing factor (withdrawal, stress), and dopamine (craving, seeking, wanting). With such strong neurochemistry in dysregulated states, it will be extremely difficult to manage emotions or make logical decisions.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/neurosagacity/201701/the-brain-can-work-against-abuse-victims

Trauma Bond with Abusive Parent

The term ‘trauma bond‘ is also known as Stockholm Syndrome. It describes a deep bond which forms between a victim and their abuser. Victims of abuse often develop a strong sense of loyalty towards their abuser, despite the fact that the bond is damaging to them.

The symptoms of trauma bonding can manifest:

  • Negative feelings for potential rescuers
  • Support of abusers reasons and behaviours
  • Inability to engage in behaviours that will assist release/detachment from abusers

https://paceuk.info/child-sexual-exploitation/what-is-trauma-bonding/

What do clients say about their experiences of EMDR in the research literature?

EMDR is talked about in a transformative manner. There are conditions, which need to be present for EMDR to work, and connections exist between the EMDR method and therapist as agents of change. For practitioners, a pluralistic approach, incorporating the EMDR method could be used to carry out tasks in therapy to achieve therapeutic goals based on the client’s requirements. In research, the paucity of qualitative studies could be addressed by engaging counselling psychologists, as scientific enquirers and artistic therapists, to expand research into clients’ experiences of EMDR to improve therapeutic practice and treatment programmes. Areas suggested for further qualitative experiential research include adverse effects, tolerability and withdrawal from therapy; EMDR for specific populations, such as combat veterans where the quantitative evidence is equivocal; and EMDR therapy practised in inpatient settings.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S246874991830036X

Change

Change is the natural order of things and not something that you benefit from resisting.
We live in a time of enormous upheaval on a global scale, and more and more people are seeing huge changes in their personal lives as well. 

It is the nature of the world in which we live.
Move with grace in the face of these changes, for every change brings you an incredible opportunity for growth. 

Breathe, relax, and know with confidence that all things will work out for you.”

Help with PTSD and C-PTSD

EMDR Therapy